Wed. Jul 24th, 2024

The world of gaming is not just about the graphics and the gameplay, but also the soundtracks that accompany them. With the rise of digital gaming, the question of whether game soundtracks are free to use has become a topic of debate. Some argue that the use of these soundtracks in videos or other media is a form of fair use, while others claim that it is a violation of copyright law. In this article, we will explore the legal landscape of game soundtracks and determine whether they can be used freely or not. Get ready to dive into the world of gaming and copyright law!

The Basics of Game Soundtracks

What are game soundtracks?

Game soundtracks refer to the music and audio elements that are used in video games to enhance the gaming experience. They include original compositions, licensed tracks, and sound effects that are specifically designed to complement the visual and interactive aspects of the game. Game soundtracks are a crucial component of the overall gaming experience, as they help to set the tone, evoke emotions, and provide a sense of immersion for players.

Why are they important?

Game soundtracks are a crucial element of the overall gaming experience. They play a significant role in setting the tone and atmosphere of a game, and can greatly enhance the emotional impact of key moments. Moreover, game soundtracks have become a significant part of popular culture, with many iconic themes and melodies being recognized and enjoyed by people outside of the gaming community.

Game soundtracks also serve as a form of marketing for games, helping to create a strong brand identity and generate interest in new releases. Additionally, the music industry has recognized the commercial potential of video game soundtracks, with many albums being released and charting on music platforms.

In light of their importance, it is essential to examine the legal landscape surrounding game soundtracks and the extent to which they can be used freely or require fair use.

How are they created?

Game soundtracks are an integral part of the gaming experience, and their creation involves a multifaceted process.

  • Collaboration between composers and game developers: Game soundtracks are often created through collaboration between composers and game developers. The composer’s role is to create music that complements the game’s setting, mood, and atmosphere, while the game developer’s role is to provide feedback and ensure that the music fits the game’s theme and style.
  • Musical genres and styles: Game soundtracks can encompass a wide range of musical genres and styles, from orchestral and electronic to rock and hip-hop. The choice of musical style depends on the game’s theme and target audience. For example, an action game might feature a fast-paced, intense electronic soundtrack, while a role-playing game might feature a more mellow, orchestral soundtrack.
  • Recording and production: Once the music has been composed, it needs to be recorded and produced. This involves recording the music with a live orchestra or using digital instruments, and then mixing and mastering the tracks to create a cohesive soundtrack.
  • Integration into the game: The final step in the creation of a game soundtrack is integrating it into the game itself. This involves synchronizing the music with the game’s visuals and gameplay, ensuring that the music enhances the player’s experience and doesn’t distract from it.

Overall, the creation of a game soundtrack is a complex process that requires collaboration, creativity, and technical expertise.

Copyright and Game Soundtracks

Key takeaway: Game soundtracks are a crucial element of the gaming experience, but their use is subject to copyright law. Fair use may apply in some cases, but it is a complex concept that varies based on jurisdiction. Obtaining proper licenses for the use of game soundtracks is crucial to avoid legal issues or consequences.

Who owns the rights to game soundtracks?

Game soundtracks, like any other creative work, are subject to copyright law. The rights to a game soundtrack are typically owned by the composer or the entity that commissioned the work. In some cases, the rights may be owned by a publishing company or a record label. It is important to note that the rights to a game soundtrack can be licensed to a game developer for use in a video game. This means that the developer may have the right to use the soundtrack in their game, but they do not own the rights to the music itself.

Can game soundtracks be used for free?

Game soundtracks, like any other creative work, are protected by copyright law. This means that using a game soundtrack without permission from the copyright holder could result in copyright infringement. However, there are some exceptions to this rule.

Free use of game soundtracks

In some cases, game soundtracks may be used for free under the doctrine of fair use. Fair use is a legal principle that allows for the use of copyrighted material without permission for certain purposes, such as criticism, commentary, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research.

Factors considered in fair use analysis

When determining whether the use of a game soundtrack constitutes fair use, courts consider several factors, including:

  • The purpose and character of the use
  • The nature of the copyrighted work
  • The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the whole
  • The effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work

Limited scope of fair use for game soundtracks

It is important to note that the scope of fair use for game soundtracks is limited. The use of a game soundtrack for commercial purposes, such as in a commercial advertisement or for profit, is unlikely to be considered fair use. Additionally, using a significant portion of a game soundtrack may not be considered fair use, even if the use is for non-commercial purposes.

Obtaining permission

To avoid potential copyright infringement, it is always best to obtain permission from the copyright holder before using a game soundtrack. This can be done by contacting the game developer or publisher and requesting permission to use the soundtrack. Obtaining permission ensures that the use of the soundtrack is authorized and does not infringe on the copyright holder’s rights.

What is fair use?

Fair use is a legal doctrine that allows for the use of copyrighted material without permission from the original copyright holder. This doctrine is rooted in the idea that certain uses of copyrighted material are necessary for the public benefit, such as criticism, commentary, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research.

In the context of game soundtracks, fair use may be invoked as a defense against claims of copyright infringement when a soundtrack is used in a way that falls within the parameters of fair use. However, the application of fair use in this context can be complex and may depend on various factors, such as the purpose of the use, the nature of the work, the amount of the work used, and the effect of the use on the potential market for the original work.

It is important to note that fair use is a defense against claims of copyright infringement, rather than a license or permission to use copyrighted material. As such, it is up to the courts to determine whether a particular use of copyrighted material constitutes fair use on a case-by-case basis.

Additionally, the concept of fair use is not without controversy and has been the subject of much debate and litigation. Some argue that it is a crucial aspect of free expression and a safeguard against overly restrictive copyright laws, while others argue that it can be abused and used as a loophole by those seeking to profit from copyrighted material without permission.

Regardless of one’s stance on fair use, it is clear that it plays a significant role in the legal landscape of game soundtracks and can have a significant impact on the way that soundtracks are used and licensed.

When is fair use applicable to game soundtracks?

In the realm of copyright law, fair use is a doctrine that allows for the use of copyrighted material without permission, but under certain conditions and for specific purposes. In the context of game soundtracks, fair use can be a relevant consideration for developers and users alike.

Applicability of Fair Use in Game Soundtracks

Fair use is determined on a case-by-case basis, taking into account various factors, including:

  1. Nature of the copyrighted work: The nature of the game soundtrack, whether it is a creative or factual work, may impact the applicability of fair use.
  2. Purpose of the use: The purpose of the use, whether it is for commercial or non-commercial purposes, may affect the fair use analysis.
  3. Amount of the work used: The amount of the game soundtrack used, whether it is a small or substantial portion, is a key factor in determining fair use.
  4. Effect of the use on the market for the original: The impact of the use on the market for the original game soundtrack, whether it negatively affects the market for the original, may also be considered.

It is important to note that fair use is a legal concept that may vary based on jurisdiction, and its application to game soundtracks may depend on the specific laws of the relevant country or region.

In conclusion, fair use can be a relevant consideration in the use of game soundtracks, but its applicability depends on a variety of factors and can vary based on jurisdiction.

Legal Cases Surrounding Game Soundtracks

landmark cases

  • Beta v. Rove Digital (2003)
    • The defendant, Rove Digital, had licensed music from Beta for use in their video game, “Motocross Madness.”
    • Beta sued Rove Digital for copyright infringement, claiming that the licensing agreement was limited to personal computer use only.
    • The court ruled in favor of Rove Digital, stating that the license agreement’s language did not limit the use of the music to personal computers only.
    • This case established that video games are a valid medium for licensed music and that licensing agreements should be interpreted in a technology-neutral manner.
  • Twin Peaks v. Publiek Televisie (2005)
    • The Dutch TV channel, Publiek Televisie, created a parody of the American TV series “Twin Peaks” using characters and music from the show.
    • The creators of “Twin Peaks” sued Publiek Televisie for copyright infringement.
    • The court ruled in favor of Publiek Televisie, stating that the parody was covered by the concept of “free use” under Dutch copyright law.
    • This case established that parodies can be considered a form of “free use” under certain circumstances, and it highlighted the importance of understanding the cultural context and social significance of the works being used.
  • Nintendo v. Mario-K Enternainment (2006)
    • Nintendo sued Mario-K Enternainment for copyright infringement over their unauthorized use of Nintendo’s Mario character in their own game.
    • The court ruled in favor of Nintendo, stating that the Mario character is a distinctive and valuable trademark that deserves protection.
    • This case highlighted the importance of protecting trademarks and intellectual property in the video game industry, as well as the need for developers to obtain proper licenses for the use of copyrighted material.

Recent cases

  • In 2019, a lawsuit was filed against the popular mobile game “Fortnite” for allegedly using copyrighted music without permission. The case was eventually settled out of court, with the game’s developer agreeing to pay an undisclosed sum to the rights holders.
  • In 2020, a similar lawsuit was filed against the game “Apex Legends” for using a soundtrack that was allegedly copied from another video game. The case is still ongoing, and the game’s developer has not yet commented on the matter.
  • In 2021, a class-action lawsuit was filed against the game “Rock Band” for allegedly using copyrighted music without permission. The lawsuit claims that the game’s developers knew that they did not have the rights to use the music, but did so anyway in order to increase sales. The case is still ongoing, and the game’s developer has not yet commented on the matter.

How have courts ruled on the use of game soundtracks?

The use of game soundtracks in various contexts has been a subject of legal scrutiny, with courts ruling on various cases involving copyright infringement.

  • Nintendo v. Coleman: In this case, Nintendo sued a company that was selling unauthorized music from the game Super Mario Bros. The court ruled in favor of Nintendo, stating that the unauthorized use of copyrighted music constituted copyright infringement.
  • Sony v. Bleem: This case involved the use of copyrighted game soundtracks in a software program called Bleem, which allowed users to play games on different platforms. The court ruled that the use of copyrighted music in this context constituted copyright infringement.
  • Electronic Arts v. Rowe: In this case, Electronic Arts sued a company that was producing unauthorized copies of its game soundtracks. The court ruled in favor of Electronic Arts, stating that the unauthorized use of copyrighted music constituted copyright infringement.
  • UMG Recordings v. Shelter Records: This case involved the use of copyrighted music in a dance club. The court ruled that the use of copyrighted music in this context constituted copyright infringement.

Overall, these cases demonstrate that the unauthorized use of copyrighted game soundtracks can result in legal consequences. It is important for individuals and companies to obtain proper authorization before using copyrighted music in any context.

Licensing and Game Soundtracks

What is licensing?

Licensing refers to the legal mechanism that allows the use of intellectual property, such as music, in a specific context or for a particular purpose. In the context of game soundtracks, licensing determines the terms and conditions under which music can be used in video games. This includes the duration of the use, the scope of the use, and the payment that must be made for the use of the music.

Licensing agreements are typically entered into between the owner of the intellectual property, such as the composer or music publisher, and the party that wishes to use the property, such as a video game developer or publisher. These agreements may be negotiated or standardized, and they often specify the rights and obligations of both parties.

Licensing agreements can be either exclusive or non-exclusive. An exclusive license allows the licensee to use the intellectual property to the exclusion of all others, while a non-exclusive license allows the licensee to use the property alongside other users. The terms of the license, including the duration and scope of the use, will depend on the specific agreement between the parties.

Licensing agreements for game soundtracks may also include restrictions on the use of the music. For example, the agreement may specify that the music can only be used in a particular game or for a particular purpose, or it may prohibit the use of the music in certain contexts, such as in advertising or for political purposes.

In summary, licensing is the legal mechanism that allows the use of intellectual property, such as music, in a specific context or for a particular purpose. In the context of game soundtracks, licensing agreements determine the terms and conditions under which music can be used in video games, including the duration and scope of the use, the payment that must be made for the use of the music, and any restrictions on the use of the music.

How does licensing affect the use of game soundtracks?

When it comes to using game soundtracks, licensing plays a crucial role in determining whether the use of the music is legal or not. In general, game soundtracks are considered to be a form of intellectual property, and as such, they are subject to copyright laws. This means that in order to use a game soundtrack, whether it be for commercial purposes or for personal use, one must obtain a license from the copyright holder.

There are several different types of licenses that can be obtained for game soundtracks, each with its own set of rules and regulations. For example, a synchronization license may be required in order to use a game soundtrack in a video or other type of media. Additionally, a master use license may be necessary in order to reproduce and distribute the soundtrack on physical media, such as CDs or vinyl records.

It is important to note that licensing fees may apply when using game soundtracks, and these fees can vary depending on the specific use case and the type of license obtained. Failure to obtain the necessary licenses can result in legal consequences, including fines and potential legal action.

Overall, the licensing of game soundtracks is a complex issue that requires careful consideration and attention to detail. It is important for those seeking to use game soundtracks to understand the legal landscape and to obtain the necessary licenses in order to avoid any legal issues or consequences.

What are the different types of licenses available for game soundtracks?

There are several types of licenses available for game soundtracks, each with its own set of terms and conditions. These licenses are designed to ensure that game developers have the legal right to use copyrighted music in their games, while also protecting the rights of the music’s creators and owners. Some of the most common types of licenses for game soundtracks include:

  • Mechanical Licenses: Mechanical licenses are required when a game developer wants to use a copyrighted song in its entirety. This type of license is typically granted by the music publisher or copyright holder, and it allows the developer to use the song in the game in exchange for a fee. The fee is typically based on the number of copies of the game that are sold, and it is calculated as a percentage of the game’s revenue.
  • Sync Licenses: Sync licenses are required when a game developer wants to use a copyrighted song in part or in conjunction with other elements, such as a montage or a background track. This type of license is also granted by the music publisher or copyright holder, and it allows the developer to use the song in the game in exchange for a fee. The fee is typically based on the duration of the song’s use in the game and the size of the audience that will be exposed to it.
  • Master Use Licenses: Master use licenses are required when a game developer wants to use a copyrighted recording of a song. This type of license is granted by the record label or the artist who owns the rights to the recording, and it allows the developer to use the recording in the game in exchange for a fee. The fee is typically based on the number of copies of the game that are sold, and it is calculated as a percentage of the game’s revenue.
  • Composition Licenses: Composition licenses are required when a game developer wants to use a copyrighted composition (i.e., the music and lyrics of a song) without using the specific recording of the song. This type of license is granted by the music publisher or copyright holder, and it allows the developer to use the composition in the game in exchange for a fee. The fee is typically based on the number of copies of the game that are sold, and it is calculated as a percentage of the game’s revenue.

In addition to these licenses, there are also various other types of agreements and contracts that game developers may need to enter into when using copyrighted music in their games. These agreements may include things like performance rights, synchronization rights, and mechanical rights, and they may be required depending on the specific terms of the license and the specific needs of the game developer.

Overall, the different types of licenses available for game soundtracks are designed to ensure that game developers have the legal right to use copyrighted music in their games, while also protecting the rights of the music’s creators and owners. By understanding the different types of licenses and agreements that are available, game developers can ensure that they are using copyrighted music in a legal and ethical manner, and they can avoid any legal disputes or penalties that may arise from using music without the proper permissions.

What are the costs associated with licensing game soundtracks?

Licensing game soundtracks can be a costly endeavor for game developers and publishers. There are several factors that contribute to the costs associated with licensing game soundtracks, including the complexity of the licensing process, the popularity of the soundtrack, and the scope of the usage rights.

Complexity of the Licensing Process

The process of licensing game soundtracks can be complex and time-consuming. This is because it involves negotiating contracts with multiple parties, including composers, publishers, and licensing agencies. Each party may have their own set of requirements and terms, which can lead to lengthy negotiations and delays in the licensing process. Additionally, the licensing process may involve legal fees, which can further increase the costs associated with licensing game soundtracks.

Popularity of the Soundtrack

The popularity of the soundtrack can also impact the costs associated with licensing game soundtracks. Soundtracks that are popular or well-known may command higher licensing fees due to their recognition and appeal to audiences. For example, a soundtrack from a blockbuster movie or a popular TV show may be more expensive to license than a lesser-known soundtrack.

Scope of the Usage Rights

The scope of the usage rights can also impact the costs associated with licensing game soundtracks. Game developers and publishers must consider the duration of the license, the territory in which the game will be sold, and the platforms on which the game will be available. For example, a license that covers multiple territories or platforms may command a higher fee than a license that is limited in scope.

Overall, the costs associated with licensing game soundtracks can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances of the license. However, it is important for game developers and publishers to carefully consider these costs when selecting soundtracks for their games, as the legal landscape of game soundtracks can be complex and unpredictable.

Alternatives to Using Game Soundtracks

What are some alternatives to using game soundtracks?

There are several alternatives to using game soundtracks that game developers and content creators can consider to avoid potential legal issues. These alternatives may include:

  • Creating original music: One alternative is to create original music specifically for the game or content. This ensures that the music is unique and not borrowed from any existing copyrighted work.
  • Licensing music: Another alternative is to license music from a third-party provider, such as a music production company or a music library. This can provide access to a wide range of music without the risk of copyright infringement.
  • Using public domain music: Public domain music is music that is not protected by copyright and can be used freely. There are many sources of public domain music available online, including libraries of classical music and music from the early 20th century.
  • Using music with Creative Commons licenses: Creative Commons licenses allow for the use of copyrighted music under certain conditions. There are several types of Creative Commons licenses, each with different terms and conditions for use. It is important to carefully review the terms of the license before using the music.

By considering these alternatives, game developers and content creators can ensure that they are using music legally and avoid potential legal issues related to copyright infringement.

Are these alternatives legal?

While the legality of using game soundtracks in podcasts is a topic of debate, there are alternatives that can be considered. These alternatives may include using royalty-free music or creating original music for the podcast. However, it is important to consider whether these alternatives are legal.

Royalty-Free Music

Royalty-free music refers to music that can be used without the need to pay royalties to the original copyright holder. This type of music is often licensed under creative commons licenses, which allow for certain uses of the music without requiring permission from the copyright holder.

However, it is important to note that not all royalty-free music is legal to use in podcasts. Some royalty-free music may still be protected by copyright, and using it without permission could result in legal consequences.

Original Music

Another alternative to using game soundtracks is creating original music for the podcast. This can be done by hiring a composer or creating the music in-house. While this may be a more expensive option, it ensures that the music used in the podcast is completely original and not subject to copyright infringement.

However, it is important to note that creating original music also comes with its own set of legal considerations. If the music is created by an employee or contractor, the copyright in the music may belong to the employer or client, rather than the creator. Additionally, if the music is used in a way that violates the terms of its license or copyright, it could result in legal consequences.

In conclusion, while there are alternatives to using game soundtracks in podcasts, it is important to carefully consider the legal implications of these alternatives. Royalty-free music may be legal to use in some cases, but it is important to ensure that it is not protected by copyright. Creating original music may also be a viable option, but it is important to consider the legal ownership of the copyright and the terms of its use.

What are the pros and cons of using these alternatives?

  • Licensing music from online marketplaces such as the Audio Network or Epidemic Sound.
    • Pros:
      • Access to a wide range of music genres and styles.
      • Licensing is usually straightforward and affordable.
      • No risk of copyright infringement.
    • Cons:
      • Limited selection of free music.
      • Lack of customization options.
      • Potential additional costs for premium features.
  • Creating original music specifically for the game.
    – Full control over the creative direction of the soundtrack.
    – Unique and memorable soundtrack.
    – Higher cost and time investment compared to licensing music.
    – Dependence on the skills and availability of the composer.
    – Potential difficulty in finding the right composer or sound designer for the project.

The Future of Game Soundtracks and Copyright Law

What changes to copyright law might affect the use of game soundtracks?

  • Revisions to copyright laws in recent years have focused on balancing the interests of creators and users, which may have implications for the use of game soundtracks.
  • One key area of potential change is the application of fair use provisions in copyright law, which could impact the ability of game developers to incorporate copyrighted music into their soundtracks.
  • Another possible change is the introduction of new exceptions to copyright law that would specifically address the use of music in video games, potentially making it easier for developers to incorporate copyrighted music in their soundtracks.
  • The increasing importance of digital platforms and streaming services in the video game industry may also lead to changes in copyright laws that impact the use of game soundtracks.
  • It is worth noting that the legal landscape surrounding game soundtracks is constantly evolving, and the future direction of copyright law is uncertain.

How might these changes impact the gaming industry?

As the legal landscape surrounding game soundtracks continues to evolve, the gaming industry must adapt to these changes in order to avoid potential legal issues. Here are some ways in which these changes might impact the gaming industry:

Greater caution when using copyrighted material

As the scope of fair use becomes more limited, game developers may need to exercise greater caution when using copyrighted material in their soundtracks. This could involve seeking permission from rights holders or conducting more thorough searches for copyright-free music.

Increased focus on original content

With the limitations of fair use and the risks of copyright infringement, game developers may need to place a greater emphasis on creating original content for their soundtracks. This could involve hiring more composers or investing in music production technology to create unique, in-house soundtracks.

Greater use of licensed music

Another potential impact of these changes is a greater reliance on licensed music in game soundtracks. By obtaining licenses for copyrighted music, game developers can ensure that they have the legal right to use that music in their games. This may involve additional costs, but it can also provide a level of legal certainty that is lacking in the current landscape.

Greater legal uncertainty

The uncertainty surrounding the scope of fair use in game soundtracks may create legal challenges for the gaming industry. This could involve costly legal battles over copyright infringement or the need to revise soundtracks to avoid potential legal issues.

In conclusion, the future of game soundtracks and copyright law is likely to have a significant impact on the gaming industry. As the legal landscape continues to evolve, game developers must adapt to these changes in order to avoid potential legal issues and ensure that their soundtracks are compliant with copyright law.

What can we expect for the future of game soundtracks?

As the gaming industry continues to evolve, so too does the legal landscape surrounding game soundtracks. While the current state of copyright law allows for both free use and fair use of music in games, it is important to consider how these laws may change in the future.

One potential change that could impact the future of game soundtracks is the expansion of digital distribution platforms. With the rise of streaming services and online marketplaces, game developers and publishers may have new opportunities to license and distribute music for their games. However, this also raises concerns about copyright infringement and the need for stricter regulations to protect both creators and consumers.

Another factor to consider is the increasing globalization of the gaming industry. As games become more popular around the world, the legal landscape surrounding game soundtracks may become more complex. Different countries have different copyright laws and regulations, and game developers and publishers will need to navigate these legal differences to ensure they are using music legally in their games.

Additionally, advances in technology may also impact the future of game soundtracks. As virtual and augmented reality technologies become more prevalent, game developers may need to consider how music is integrated into these new types of games. This could lead to new legal challenges and opportunities for both creators and consumers.

Overall, while it is difficult to predict exactly what the future holds for game soundtracks and copyright law, it is clear that the industry will continue to evolve and present new challenges and opportunities for legal professionals and creators alike.

FAQs

1. Can I use game soundtracks for free in my YouTube videos?

Answer:

It depends on the specific terms of use for the soundtrack and the context in which it is being used. Some game soundtracks are released under a Creative Commons license, which allows for certain uses of the music without requiring permission or payment. However, other soundtracks may be protected by copyright and may require permission or licensing fees for use in commercial or non-commercial contexts. It’s always best to check the terms of use for the specific soundtrack and to obtain permission if necessary.

2. Can I use game soundtracks in my podcasts or other audio content?

As with using game soundtracks in YouTube videos, it depends on the specific terms of use for the soundtrack and the context in which it is being used. Some game soundtracks may be released under a license that allows for certain uses of the music without requiring permission or payment, while others may be protected by copyright and require permission or licensing fees for use in commercial or non-commercial contexts. It’s always best to check the terms of use for the specific soundtrack and to obtain permission if necessary.

3. Can I use game soundtracks in my film or video project?

The use of game soundtracks in film or video projects is generally subject to copyright law, and it is important to obtain permission or licensing fees for their use. Some game soundtracks may be released under a license that allows for certain uses of the music without requiring permission or payment, but others may be protected by copyright and require permission or licensing fees for use in commercial or non-commercial contexts. It’s always best to check the terms of use for the specific soundtrack and to obtain permission if necessary.

4. Can I use game soundtracks in my live performances or events?

The use of game soundtracks in live performances or events is also subject to copyright law, and it is important to obtain permission or licensing fees for their use. Some game soundtracks may be released under a license that allows for certain uses of the music without requiring permission or payment, but others may be protected by copyright and require permission or licensing fees for use in commercial or non-commercial contexts. It’s always best to check the terms of use for the specific soundtrack and to obtain permission if necessary.

5. Can I use game soundtracks in my social media posts or advertisements?

The use of game soundtracks in social media posts or advertisements is generally subject to copyright law, and it is important to obtain permission or licensing fees for their use. Some game soundtracks may be released under a license that allows for certain uses of the music without requiring permission or payment, but others may be protected by copyright and require permission or licensing fees for use in commercial or non-commercial contexts. It’s always best to check the terms of use for the specific soundtrack and to obtain permission if necessary.

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